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Are you willing to share your answers to EHCP section F? If yes, please make sure you remove personal data, such as names.

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  • 17 Jan 2022
  • Yes

    Complex

    PART F – MY SPECIAL EDUCATION PROVISION

    [EHCP: Amended Final Following Appeal Hearing and 1st Tier SENDIST Decision]

    These must include all the needs specified in Section B and where a social care and/or health provision supports a child or young person with their education or training.

    COMMUNICATION AND INTERACTION

    Communication and Interaction short term outcomes (from Section E), by the end of Key Stage 2:

    (1) [child] will be able to communicate effectively in order to express his wants, needs, thoughts, feelings and ideas more successfully throughout the day.

    (2) [child] will develop his understanding and expressive language skills so that he is able to consistently process instructions with 4 key words or concepts.

    (3) He will be able to form key word sentences and ask questions with a range of ‘wh’ questions. such that the differential between [child] and his peers in this area is significantly reduced.

    (4) [child] will measurably develop practical and functional communication skills across different settings to significantly reduce the differential between himself and his unimpaired peers.

    (5) [child] will measurably develop his social communication skills and will have significantly reduced the differential he has in this area between himself and his unimpaired peers

    What help do I need to make this happen and how will it be delivered?

    Item 1:

    • A specific structured language and communication programme set within the school designed and maintained by the Speech and Language Therapist in liaison with other professionals and implemented by school staff to ensure it is embedded into [child]’s curriculum.
    • The speech and language therapist will individualise the programme using a range of resources and methods
    • [child] requires his own tablet for developing his learning and language skills
    • Work on his expressive language targets in one-to-one and small group interventions.
    • Use of motivating items and activities

    How often?

    • Weekly individual direct sessions of 60 minutes from speech and language therapist and attended by [child]’s TA/LSA, with daily carry over of the programme by school staff

    What resources are required and who will provide them?

    • Speech and Language Therapist/ Teaching staff
    • Further details of the input from a speech and language therapist are set out in the table at the end of Section F

    Item 2:

    • Use of the Attention Autism / Look See method in small group motivating sessions designed to practice joint attention; turn taking, eye contact etc.
    • [child] requires a social thinking, and communication and interaction programme. This will be designed and maintained by the speech and language therapist within the SCERTS framework within a multi- disciplinary framework and implemented throughout [child]’s school day.

    How often?

    • As directed by the speech and language therapist Daily

    What resources are required and who will provide them?

    • Teaching staff and Speech and language therapist to deliver training in a setting which does not have experienced and training in the SCERTS framework. Further details of the speech and language therapy programme is set out in the table at the end of Section F

    PHYSICAL AND SENSORY NEEDS

    Physical and Sensory short-term outcomes (from Section E), by the end of Key Stage 2:

    (1) Handwriting: [child] to be able to independently write a sentence using a tripod grip and appropriate sizing of letters.

    (2) Feeding: [child] will be able to co-ordinate knife and fork movements and eat school dinners, independently,

    (3) Dressing: [child] to be able to independently dress the top half of his body, putting on clothes the correct way

    (4) Toileting: [child] to be able to go to the toilet in school independently when required

    (5) [child] to be able to wipe his bottom after bowel movement and attend to his personal hygiene after using the toilet.

    (6) Sensory: [child] to have safe and appropriate chewable toy to satisfy his sensory needs.

    (7) [child] will measurably develop his fine motor skills and will have significantly reduced the differential he has in this area between himself and his unimpaired peers

    (8) [child] will measurably develop his handwriting skill and will significantly reduce the differential he has in this area between himself and his unimpaired peers.

    (9) [child] will measurably develop his independence and self-care skills and will significantly reduce the differential he has in this area between himself and his unimpaired peers

    What help do I need to make this happen and how will it be delivered?

    Item 1:

    • Sensory exploration activities
    • [child] will require implementation of a programme of sensory
    • strategies to assist him to achieve a ‘just right’ level of attention and concentration and to decrease the anxiety he experiences

    How often?

    • Daily

    What resources are required and who will provide them?

    • Weekly input from an Occupational Therapist with daily carry over by teaching staff.
    • The details of the input from the occupation therapist are set out in the table at the end of Section F

    Item 2:

    • An individualised programme to develop his handwriting skills. This will be designed and maintained by the occupational therapist

    How often?

    • Daily

    What resources are required and who will provide them?

    • Occupational Therapist Teacher and LSA with advice from specialist teacher and other relevant specialists

    Item 3:

    • Weekly individual direct therapy from an Occupational Therapist of 30 minutes in length and attended by [child]’s TA/ LSA to ensure programmes are carried thought his school day by being embedded into his curriculum. These sessions will focus on delivering programmes designed and maintained by the occupational therapist to meet [child]’s sensory, motor and regulation needs and develop his independence skills.

    How often?

    • 30 minutes per week from the occupational therapist and daily carry over by school staff

    What resources are required and who will provide them?

    • Occupational Therapist, LSA and teaching staff

    Item 4:

    • Dedicated TA/ LSA support during lunch time to prompt him to eat and to encourage increasing independence.
    • [child] will need a programme from the occupational therapist to develop his independence and self-care skills

    How often?

    • Daily

    What resources are required and who will provide them?

    • Teacher and LSA with advice from the autism specialist teacher and occupational therapist

     

    EDUCATION AND LEARNING NEEDS

    Education and Learning short term outcomes (from Section E), by the end of Key Stage 2:

    (1) Attention: [child] to increase his focus on non-preferred tasks by managing self- regulation

    (2) [child] to significantly develop his skills to work with a written timetable to help him follow and understand the routines and expectations of working within school and also to enable him to be significantly better to be able to understand transitions between activities and feel prepared so he can accept new or unexpected situations.

    (3) [child] will measurably develop his attention and listening skills and will have significantly reduced the differential he has in these areas between himself and his unimpaired peers.

    (4) [child] will measurably develop his learning skills in maths and English and will have significantly reduced the differential he has in these areas between himself and his unimpaired peers.

    What help do I need to make this happen and how will it be delivered?

    • [child] requires a highly structured and individualised literacy programme addressing comprehension, vocabulary, spelling and phonics, comprehension and handwriting [child] needs a highly structured and individualised mathematics programme [child] requires a highly differentiated curriculum
    • [child] requires visuals to help him understand the structure of the school day, individual activities and also as an aide to support him to work more independently, as advised by the specialist teacher.
    • [child]’s curriculum should be predominately delivered through 1:1 and small group teaching session, as far as possible within his mainstream classroom setting. Group sessions should be with no more than 4 other pupils and [child]
    • should still have 1:1 support.

    How often?

    • Daily, delivered either 1:1 or in paired teaching

    What resources are required and who will provide them?

    • Programmes should be devised collaboratively by the autism specialist teacher, speech and language therapist, classroom teacher and occupational therapist.
    • Daily delivery by LSA

     

    SOCIAL, EMOTIONAL AND MENTAL HEALTH NEEDS

    Social, emotional and mental health needs short term outcomes (from Section E) by the end of Key Stage 2:

    (1) [child] will be better able to manage his anxiety and developed his self-regulation skills and will have significantly reduced the differential he has in these areas between himself and his unimpaired peers.

    (2) [child] will be better able to manage the adverse effects associated with his sensory impairments and will have significantly reduced the differential he has in this area between himself and his unimpaired peers.

    What help do I need to make this happen and how will it be delivered?

    [child] requires high levels of structure and organisation within his day to help alleviate his anxiety using strategies recommended by the specialist teacher including:

    • The use of a TEACCH style approach
    • A clear and simple individual workspace with access to a calm and quiet environment which can be used for [child]’s 1:1 teaching for Maths, English and social skills along with any other discrete teaching sessions

    How often?

    • Daily

    What resources are required and who will provide them?

    • Programmes should be devised collaboratively by the autism specialist teacher, speech and language therapist, classroom teacher and occupational therapist.
    • Daily delivery by LSA

     

    FURTHER SPECIFICS OF PROVISION IN RELATION TO ALL OUTCOMES

    Training of staff:

    (1) All teaching/learning support assistants working with [child] should hold or be working towards a Level 3 Diploma in Specialist Support for Teaching and learning or another equivalent appropriate training which can include in-house training delivered after recruitment to post.

    (2) Where specific strategies are required e.g. TEACCH, Attention Autism, social stories, staff delivering these interventions must have appropriate training in the particular method (which can include in house training) to ensure all protocols are delivered accurately and safely and achieve the maximum impact.

    (3) The Specialist Advisory teacher will have appropriate training and experience in working with children with ASD & ADHD. This will include experience in the education of children with Autism and practical experience of effectively differentiating a mainstream curriculum and embedding interventions and therapy within the main classroom activities.

    Hours of 1:1 support from learning support assistant

    [child] will receive 1:1 support from a learning support assistant for 32.5 hours per week. This will be delivered by two persons to ensure continuity and the development of a relationship with [child] and so that provision is made during staff absences and also to ensure that [child] works with more than one adult. In addition, the TA/LSA will require a further 30 minutes per day to allow for preparation and planning of [child]’s curriculum in liaison with the class teacher and autism specialist teacher. [child]’s TA/LSA’s will attend his therapy sessions to ensure programmes are carried over and embedded into his curriculum.

    Support from Specialist Advisory Teacher

    [child] will receive support from a Specialist Advisory teacher (with the experience and training described above) weekly, for sessions of one hour. In the first half of [child]’s first term in his new placement, the sessions will be two hours per week to ensure a smooth transition.

    In addition to the weekly visits, additional time from the Specialist Advisory Teacher will be required as follows:

    • 3 hours per year to complete a review report for the annual review and to attend the annual review.
    • 1 hour per term should be allocated for liaison with school staff together with the speech and language therapist and occupational therapist.

    Speech and Language Therapy

    [child] requires the following input from a qualified speech and language therapist who is trained to use SCERTS.

    This is made up of:

    • A direct therapy programme consisting of individual sessions of 60 minutes per week throughout the school year during term time.
    • 12 hours of direct therapy per annum for the development, introduction and maintenance of a social thinking, communication and interaction programme subject to the proviso set out below
    • 3 hours per annum for termly multidisciplinary working meetings
    • 6 hours per annum for assessment, programme updating, report writing, liaising with staff and parents and attending the review meeting

    The 12 hours of speech and language therapist time will not be required in an environment where the staff are already trained and experienced in using SCERTS.

    Occupational Therapy

    [child] requires the following input from a qualified occupational therapist with training and experience in delivering sensory integration strategies.

    This is made up of:

    • A direct therapy programme consisting of individual sessions of 30 minutes per week throughout the school year during term time
    • Development and monitoring of programme of activities and strategies: 4 hours per annum
    • Setting of IEP targets and monthly multidisciplinary working meetings: 3 hours per annum
    • Review meeting/ report: 3 hours per annum

    Liaison with parents

    A termly meeting between teaching staff, therapists and [child]’s parents will take place for 1 hour to update programmes and share relevant information about [child]. The school must communicate as frequently as possible with the parents to help parents coordinate their reinforcement system with the School’s system.

    Differentiation of the National Curriculum

    [child] will follow the National Curriculum, but this will be differentiated to ensure his successful engagement

  • Comment

  • 19 May 2021
  • Yes

    Other

    [section F was combined with E, G, H in the original EHCP]

    Communication and Interaction
    The provision to meet these outcomes
    (including who will do what, when and how often, including where this support is secured through a personal budget)

    (F) Education Provision
    - Speech and language intervention sessions as advised by a speech and language therapist as appropriate
    - All staff who work with [child] to be aware of the range and extent of his expressive and receptive language difficulties and strategies which they will need to implement to help support those difficulties.
    - Opportunities for small group language skills work.
    - Verbal instructions need to be individualised for [child]: preceded by his name, rephrased, repeated, simplified and accompanied by visual cues wherever possible. Staggered information delivery, to allow [child] to complete one part of the task before the next instruction is delivered.
    - Pre-tutoring of language concepts as well as provision of glossaries of topic related vocabulary sent home prior to new topics for [child] to familiarise himself with the new words. Only relevant information will be offered, as well as limiting the amount of information delivered per page.
    - [child] will be provided with copies of lesson notes rather than [child] being required to take notes from the board in a limited time frame. Handouts with summaries and important points highlighted may be helpful. It may be beneficial to [child] if he is presented with an overall outline of the whole lesson, with the main points of the lesson highlighted so [child] can see the beginning, middle and end. ‘Must know’, ‘should know’ and ‘could know’ part of information may help [child] prioritise his learning.
    - [child] will be provided with additional time to read through information and complete written work.
    - Additional time to process instructions etc., as well as short tasks interspersed with movement breaks.
    - Adult support to access peer interactions. These could involve a structured activity and should involve a small number of children initially – up to 3.
    - Whenever new processes or procedures are introduced or directions given, [child] will be cued in using his name to first gain his attention.

    Cognition and Learning
    The provision to meet these outcomes
    (including who will do what, when and how often, including where this support is secured through a personal budget)
    (F) Education Provision
    - A modified curriculum which takes account of his level of delay and needs. He will likely find the pace of the curriculum too fast without support as he requires additional processing time and has some specific needs including dyscalculia, poor concentration and understanding.
    - [child] will be provided with copies of lesson notes rather than [child] being required to take notes from the board in a limited time frame. Handouts with summaries and important points highlighted may be helpful. It may be beneficial to [child] if he is presented with an overall outline of the whole lesson, with the main points of the lesson highlighted so [child] can see the beginning, middle and end. ‘Must know’, ‘should know’ and ‘could know’ part of information may help [child] prioritise his learning.
    - [child] will be provided with additional time to read through information and complete written work.
    - Support to develop active listening skills and opportunities to practise repeating back short task instructions.
    - Verbal instructions need to be individualised for [child]: preceded by his name, rephrased, repeated, simplified and accompanied by visual cues wherever possible.
    - Teaching should be accompanied with visual supports wherever possible to provide [child] with an object on which to focus his attention.
    - Concrete mathematical examples and materials alongside verbal explanations of new concepts.
    - Use of Numicon resources, which are helpful for children with dyscalculia,, to be used where appropriate
    - Explicit support to understand mathematical signs and symbols.
    - Use of new ICT (e.g. Apps to practise quick recall of number bonds and times tables).
    - Individual and/or small group support for Maths based upon a step by step approach.
    - Ongoing pre-tutoring of new vocabulary and glossaries should be sent home so he can be supported.
    - Reading Comprehension: Ensure the text is read correctly and encourage the use of the text as evidence, re-referring back if necessary. Reading comprehension involves the retrieval of information, deduction, inference and the formation of opinion about the text. The answers are found in different parts of the story and there may be the need to apply prior knowledge or personal experience to an answer.
    - Additional time to complete tasks in class and during examinations.

    Social, Emotional and Mental Health
    The provision to meet these outcomes
    (including who will do what, when and how often, including where this support is secured through a personal budget)
    (F) Education Provision
    - Access to regular mentoring session built into his timetable, weekly, to ensure he can raise social and academic concerns.
    - [child] should be supported to join an extra-curricular club where he can meet new friends with shared interests that he feels confident talking about. This should involve an area of his interests such as music, cooking or drawing.
    - Adult support during unstructured times (break times for example) and an adult supervised environment such as the library or other such place.

    Physical and/or sensory
    The provision to meet these outcomes
    (including who will do what, when and how often, including where this support is secured through a personal budget)
    (F) Education Provision
    - Staff to be aware of and sensitive to [child]’s gross motor difficulties and fatigue and promote good posture where appropriate
    - Staff to remind [child] when he is too close to his peers

    Self care and independence (including preparation for adulthood)
    The provision to meet these outcomes
    (including who will do what, when and how often, including where this support is secured through a personal budget)
    (F) Education Provision
    - Prompts to get dressed / undressed
    - Staff to be aware of [child]’s poor organisational skills and support where needed
    - Adult to help support transitions between lessons, whilst also promoting his independence is moving around the school

  • 1 Comment

  • 13 May 2021
  • Yes

    Other

    Section F: Resource Commitment Special Educational Provision The special educational
    provision required by the child or young person to meet their SEND and support the achievement
    of the identified outcomes.

    [child]'s school will receive an allocation of resources sufficient to provide him with 22.5 hours of
    support each week from a Learning Support Assistant. This support can be used both on an individual
    and group level. This is in addition to other resources available to [child] and other pupils in the
    school.

    Outcome (F)
    [Need: communication and interaction needs, as described in Section B.]

    If [child] makes an error in his expressive language, staff will raise his awareness of this by modelling the correct version of the utterance back to him.
    Providing him with a choice if he makes a mistake .
    Providing him with a choice if he uses the wrong vocabulary for an item.

    If he is struggling to remember a word he has come across before, supporting his word retrieval by giving the first sound of the word.

    If his sentence does not make sense, modelling it back to him and asking 'is that what you meant?' If staff are still unsure of what he means, they will ask him to try to show them, for example by taking them to the object he is talking about, drawing a picture or acting it out.

    Using a slow pace during conversation, giving him plenty of time to take turns in interacting.
    Encouraging him to take his time and think about what he wants to say before starting to speak.
    Encouraging him to make eye contact when he is telling others about something.
    Practising skills in talking about pictures, a story sequence or a book with pictures.
    Explicit teaching of topic-specific vocabulary before he encounters it within the classroom.
    A trained member of staff delivering an intervention programme (such as Colourful Semantics or Shape Coding by Susan Ebbels) to model correct grammatical sentences as part of his speech and language intervention.
    One-to-one or small group activities using visual support such as signing and symbols to aid his language development.
    Where he produces words/sentences that are unclear, adults will provide a model of the correct pronunciation.
    Reminding him that he needs to say the ends of word so that people will understand him clearly.

    Working with him discriminating between words with and without a final consonant, using the Black Sheep Press resources from speech and language therapy. Staff will work first on getting him to hear the difference between the words they say, for example by putting a block or coin on the correct word in a pair. They will then ask him to take the lead and say one of the word pair for them to listen to and point out.

    Establishing consistency in his phonological system in order for one or more delayed speech processes to be resolved.

    Short, regular speech sound work through motivating activities/games. Staff will require training and support to implement recommendations from speech and language therapy and ASD Outreach.

    If he finds it difficult to understand a story or topic, modelling a 'think out loud' approach to giving thoughts in answer to a question, for example 'I would say that... or 'I think that the book is showing us... because'. Staff will allow for repetition and highlighting of key information.

    If questions are too difficult, using forced alternatives, for example 'do you think it is X or Y?'

    Scaffolding questions to support ·hi m to make longer explanations or contributions to class discussions; moving from the concrete to the abstract, for example 'what is he feeling?' to 'how do you know?' or 'why?' using a visual 'talking prompt' to help him structure his contributions.

    Using picture scenarios and asking questions to support his ability to identify the main idea or 'gist' of the situation. Staff will make and explain an inference and problem solve by applying general knowledge and relating to personal experience. They will support him to predict what might happen next.
    Resources such as 'Think-it, Say-it' (Winslow), Practical Pragmatics (Black Sheep) or Language for Thinking (Branagan and Parsons) can support this work. This can be done within a small group setting.

    Engaging in conversation with peers daily. supported by an adult.

    Using visuals to support news sharing.

    A multi-modal system of communication involving the use of augmented communication systems such as visual timetabling, Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) and/o r signing. Teaching staff will also need to have experience and expertise in teaching children with significant speech and language impairment, if applicable.

    Adults with a high level of knowledge and expertise in the areas of ASD and language disorder.

    TAs supporting him in class to access the curriculum. They will also need to be given allocated time to plan and carry out sessions/groups, make resources and liaise regularly with the therapist and class teacher.


    Provision (F)
    [Need: Cognition and learning needs, as described in Section B]

    A high level of modelling and opportunities to practise targeted concepts.
    Furthermore, in terms of all areas of learning, staff will bear in mind that 'showing' is usually more effective than 'telling'. For example, it may help to actually 'walk' [child] through new/unfamiliar concepts.

    Differentiating all tasks and activities according to his needs and interests, for example:
    • Where possible/appropriate, alternating seated activities with those that allow [child] to move his body around the room, such as incorporating physical movement by assigning tasks including giving out or collecting resources/materials or practical learning activities into lessons.
    • Planning fast paced, short activities broken down into small steps to maintain his attention.
    • Using activities related to his personal interest as motivators for him to finish.

    Following the principles of the Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Handicapped Children (TEACCH) approach: a highly structured, visual approach to learning and supporting independence.

    Allocating different parts of speech with different colour codes to ease his comprehension, even if he cannot remember their names. Topic specific, colour-coded vocabulary mats will support his recall of specific words and ensure he does not have to worry about his spelling. Talking Mats will be utilised to help him to talk with his peers around an activity, supporting his word finding difficulties. Staff will need to support in class and have time to prepare visuals and differentiated materials to help him access the curriculum.

    Using visual organisers, colour coded writing frames and vocabulary mats to enhance his ability to organise information and produce writing. Some scaffolding, such as supporting questions, can also be useful to encourage him to consider different strands of information and expand on his writing. These questions will need to be carefully considered as he is able to answer 'what' questions and will require support to develop his understanding of 'where', 'when', 'who' and the more complicated 'why' questions. It will be important to consolidate and generalise the use of each question word before moving onto the next. so that he does not confuse these similar looking words.

    Using a task management board so that he can 'tick' off as he completes each step.
    Giving him a fixed choice of activity, with no more than two choices.
    Supporting him in a one-to-one context or one-to-one support in the classroom to help sustain his attention.
    Activities which are visual in nature to support his attention.
    Breaking down learning activities into small steps to support him to maintain his attention.
    Using visual timetables of the day's or lesson's activities so that he will know how long an activity will last and what is coming next to help maintain his attention on the current activity.
    Using visual timers to support him to sustain his attention to the current activity.
    Staff running regular Attention Autism sessions, supported by ASD Outreach.
    Using visual support to help [child] attend to activities, for example as active listening now and next boards and reward charts.
    Allowing him to use his ear defenders or to work within a quiet environment as needed.

    When [child] is given work tasks to complete independently, he will require visually relayed information about what he has to do, how much he has to do, what it will look like when it is finished, when he will be finished and what to do when he is finished. Work tasks to be completed at his work station will always need to be pre-taught before he is expected to do them independently.

    Making use of visual structure as this will provide help in terms of supporting him with understanding what is expected of him. Verbal instructions will be accompanied by visual supports that he can, over time, learn to use independently so that he can learn to monitor his work and develop a sense of achievement.

    A quiet place to work, away from distractions such as environmental noise to aid task completion, for example his own workstation.

    A school placement where his teachers have experience of teaching children with ASD. [child] may need behaviour management techniques that have been developed specifically for children with ASD.

    Support from adults who have an understanding of ASD and the associated difficulties and how to help [child] with managing them, this includes the following :
    - Supporting him with understanding when he is becoming stressed/anxious and how to begin to manage these feelings, for example short time out of class with permission.
    - Helping him to begin to identify his feelings, such as happy, sad, angry and upset. Working in partnership with [child]'s parents and outside agencies to meet his needs.


    Provision (F)
    [Need: Social, emotional and mental wellbeing needs, as described in Section B]

    Weekly social skills intervention groups led by teaching assistants, for example Lego Therapy.

    A weekly friendship group to allow him to explore the concept 'a good friend'. It will give an opportunity to develop his understanding of the following questions: How does a good friend make you feel?
    How do you treat a friend? What happens when you·disagree with a friend? How do you make friends? In this way, he can build skills to initiate, sustain and repair friendships within his peer group. A good resource is
    the book 'Using Drama to teach personal, social and emotional skills' by Jacqui O'Hanlon and Angie Wootten. Comic Strips conversations and Social Stories can also be used in a small group context to explore different situations, experiences and scenarios in order to give [child] a safe space to 'rehearse' these skills before being expected to use them in real life contexts.
    The Friendship Terrace, from Black Sheep Press, is another useful resource for whole class based or individual work. The programme helps children to recognise 'friendship blockers' and 'friendship builders' through a series of sessions to reflect on and teach friendship skills. It is based on ten stories about characters that live on friendship terrace.

    Structured activities to model and encourage positive interaction and relationships with peers. It will be helpful to incorporate his interests and link situations to his real life and the situations he encounters as much as
    possible.

    Daily work in a small group supported by an adult.
    Support at Playtimes from adults to help [child] to initiate play with his peers.
    Using prompts/social stories and lots of practice with turn taking. for example through playing football skills with one or two other children.
    Using visual prompts and/or social stories for no hitting.
    Training and support for staff to support his social skills.
    Adults who have the knowledge and expertise of working with children who experience difficulties with ASD and significant speech and language difficulties.
    Staff being aware of the possibility that the difficulties he experiences with expressing his thoughts and feelings could result in him becoming upset.
    Adults aiming to help him to begin to become aware of his feelings and emotions and how to manage them.
    Considering supporting him using the Zones of Regulation. He will require support on a daily basis to be taught the Zones curriculum by adults who are familiar with the intervention.
    Strategies to further develop [child] 's self confidence and self-esteem.
    Praise and encouragement to increase his confidence and to help him to continue to develop a positive self-image

    Provision (F)
    [Need: Sensory and physical needs, as described in Section B.]
    Setting up a sensory circuit twice a day that [child] can access in the morning on arrival and following lunch time play (see previous Drumbeat report). Within the circuit, staff will create a section on heavy work activities that include pulling, stretching and lifting weighted items. This input can have a calming and focusing effect. Supporting staff will explore a range of proprioceptive activities for [child] to explore when he is feeling over-excited/anxious.

    Using ear defenders and in the future possibly an MP3 player where he can play relaxing music to help him to focus on his work in the classroom.

    A quiet, safe space in school where he can have a break to regulate himself when he needs this adjustment and adaptation. When accessing this place, he will need adult supervision.

    Provision (F)
    [Need: Independence needs, as described in Section Outcome (E)]
    Support to meet his self-care needs regarding toileting and eating programmes.
    Support during unstructured times in the playground, at meal times and during assembly.


    Monitoring
    A Personalised Learning Plan with specific with short term targets should be set by the educational settings Special Needs Co-ordinator in [child]'s setting in consultation with his parents within two months of the final EHC Plan being issued. These targets should serve as the first steps towards the outcomes in the plan.

    [child]’s Personalised Learning Plan should be reviewed, at least termly by his class teacher, the settings Special Needs Co-ordinator, his parents and any others working with [child].

    [child]’s EHC Plan should be reviewed each vear, At this annual review meeting consideration should be given to the progress [child] has made in working towards the outcomes set for his Key Stage.

    A new Personalised Learning Plan should be set at this meeting and the school should ensure that these targets are shared with all relevant adults in [child]'s life.

    Copies of the Annual Review report should be sent to the parents, the Authority, and to all other relevant professionals working with [child].

  • Comment

  • 07 May 2021
  • Yes

    Other

    Section F

    How will the special educational provision be funded?
    From September 2017, [child]’s support needs on his post 16 course will be assessed by the post 16 provider and Local Authority to determine whether additional top up funding is required to meet his needs.

    Special educational provision (steps and activities to meet the needs in Section B)?
    Provided by: College Staff
    Often, when: daily curriculum

    Educational:
    - [child] needs educational provision that is targeting his independent living skills, but also looking at practical literacy and numeracy skills that can be applied in terms of work related aspirations.
    - [child] needs an educational setting where there is understanding of his language, speech, and social communication needs and where tasks can be differentiated to his academic levels. He needs access to teaching staff who are experienced in working with students with communication impairments, as well as learning difficulties, and where the pace of learning is adapted accordingly.
    - [child] requires a waking day provision because of his complex difficulties. He needs to overlearn the skills and in a variety of environments in order to generalise and transfer them to improve levels of function and promote independence in all aspects of daily life within the school day.
    - It is imperative that a robust transition plan is put in place, that will support [child] into adulthood and meet his outcomes. The educational setting for [child]’s next stage of training and development in preparation for transition into supported or assisted living will need to provide a balance between freedom and controls within a small community.
    - A residential placement will enable development of [child]'s social skills, critical for [child] if he is to access his community & employment in the future. It would allow the integrated delivery of required skills in an environment that would allow him to practice & develop towards achieving his future goals. Levels of support will be individualised to meet [child]’s needs. [child] will have opportunities to interact within the community through various situations including work experience.
    - Develop his writing skills, including handwriting with greater fluency.
    - Develop his numeracy skills
    - Increase his independence
    - Teaching Strategies to maximise speed of written work
    - Practice and teaching of numeracy skills so that everyday calculations can be performed unaided.
    - A structured programme to develop his reading and writing skills that will enable [child] to access functional skills courses and to be able to write the communications necessary for independent living
    - One-to-one guidance with course completion, deadline completion and exam preparation
    - Setting timed, structured tasks of work to do, developing concentration and task completion skills.
    - Encourage daily reading habit to further develop vocabulary and general knowledge
    - Opportunities to work 1-1 with a support teacher when support and guidance is needed

    Communication:
    - Further develop his listening and participation in whole class and larger group situations
    - Further develop his receptive and expressive language skills
    - Speech and Language Therapy is embedded across the 24 hour waking day curriculum. The SALT team work as part of a multi-disciplinary team to maximise staff knowledge and skills around communication (and dysphagia). This ensures therapy is embedded into college life providing a total communication approach.

    Personal, social and emotional:
    - Continue to develop self-confidence as an independent learner.
    - Provision of buddies to enable [child] to mix socially outside of, access to youth clubs and short breaks in holidays generally
    - Opportunities for reflection about social incidents so that [child] learns to discriminate between social contacts
    - Involve [child] in goal setting , monitoring and reviewing his targets
    - Opportunities for [child] to develop personal safety awareness through taught programmes so that he is more aware of the potential dangers in the community and how to make decisions that will keep him safe.
    - [child] requires support to build on his independence skills (e.g. self-care) and confidence in advocating for himself, as he gets older.
    - [child] needs a social life, away from the home environment, providing the opportunity to develop friendships and relationships with his equals, contributing towards his self-image and positive participation in a wider community.
    - [child] needs a programme that will develop his vocational and educational skills alongside his independence skills, particularly social interaction skills. This will need to include opportunities for work experience, enrichment activities and extended curriculum activities.
    - It is crucial for [child] to have access to ongoing regular support in order for him to continue to develop, reach his potential and feel included, valued and happy in his future life.

    Motor and sensory:
    - Continue to develop his fine motor skills
    Delivered by: College Staff/ Occupational Therapist

    Special educational provision (steps and activities to meet the needs in Section B)?
    Provided by: College Staff/ Occupational Therapist
    Often, when: see below

    Occupational Therapy:
    - [child] requires OT input that will be embedded within his support plan and use strategies in line with all his relevant needs. [child] requires direct and indirect input from an experienced, HCPC registered OT, however this will only be effective within the correct learning environment.
    - Life skills development within the curriculum should form a part of [child]’s learning. He requires constant reinforcement and overlearning to ensure that he learns and can consolidate his development of life skills and independence.
    - OT input needs to cover planning and intervention in relation to [child]’s physical, cognitive and emotional wellbeing, using everyday activities throughout the day with therapy aims and targets set to improve levels of function and promote independence in all aspects of daily life.

    Direct Occupational Therapy for 1 hour per month- an OTA or experienced key worker should attend all sessions in order to carry over strategies and advice into the day and residential curriculum.

    3 hours per term indirect work, plus 2 hours training per year, including liaising with teaching staff and other therapists, developing and adapting programmes, training of staff.

    Annual Review Report and Attendance

    Chair Assessment and review - Due to his low tone, it is essential to prevent inappropriate seating causing [child] fatigue. [child] needs a supportive seating system with a backrest in order to support his posture more effectively. Seating should be provided which allows [child] to adopt the ergonomic 90/90 seating posture. This means that his hips, knees and ankles should all rest at 90 degrees. The Occupational Therapist should provide advice on suitable seating and equipment to be used when seated at the table to help [child] gain more support whenever he is seated. 2 hours per year should be allocated for this.

    Provided by Teacher/TA/SLT
    Speech and Language Therapy strategies:
    - [child] requires supported learning opportunities across the waking day in situations including class-based learning, work experience settings, informal social interactions and activities of daily living.
    - [child] will need support to participate and engage with learning to an appropriate level at college. Specifically, he requires support and strategies, including input from speech and language therapy, embedded within the classroom and work experience settings, to enable him to access learning and engage socially.
    - [child] is now at the stage where he requires support that will enable him to develop the skills necessary for life outside of the family home, not just to manage in supported living, but also to become a contributing member of society. He needs to develop his social skills, language skills and life skills in a large variety of situations in order to achieve this.
    - Supported daily tasks and social activities, such as meal preparation, clubs or extra-curricular activities, that are supported by teaching staff.

    [child] requires and will be provided with the following strategies, delivered by college staff to support his language and communication skills in college:

    Support active listening through:
    - Visual cues, such as explicitly referring to the listening poster in the class, to re-focus [child]’s attention when he is distracted.
    - [child] should be encouraged to use active listening strategies to help him learn, such as ignoring distractions, thinking about the same topic that he is hearing about, checking his understanding and asking for further explanation from the teacher (as well as the TA).
    - Check with [child] what he has understood of the instructions by asking him to summarise the activity instructions. [child] could also be motivated to listen by being asked to explain the task to his TA. This would mean that [child] would feel that he has to listen to all the details so that he can tell his TA what they need to do.

    Support vocabulary learning through:
    - Modelling of new vocabulary and opportunities to use it in a range of situations.
    -‘Pre-teaching’ of key vocabulary/topic themes in order to support [child] to access lessons delivered in whole class contexts.
    -[child] should be encouraged and supported to use his vocabulary book to create word map sheets, when he encounters new vocabulary, and also refer to the vocabulary book when he encounters the word again.
    Support development of independence through:
    - The consistent use of visual information and/or use of real objects and pictures to support his understanding of new information in class.  Consistent access to, and encouragement to use, visual support resources introduced by the Speech and Language Therapist during classroom activities,
    - Opportunities for repetition and reinforcement of learning e.g. over learning of new curriculum vocabulary.
    - Frequent opportunities to work in small groups facilitated and supported by an adult to support and encourage [child]’s ability to form and maintain friendships with peers.

    Speech and Language Therapy Support

    Provided by: Staff with experience and training in working with students with significant social communication and language needs.
    Often: Daily basis throughout curriculum

    Provided by: Speech and Language Therapist
    Often: 60 minutes per term/3 hours per year

    Due to [child]’s needs, he requires speech and language therapy input as part of his educational provision. He requires a programme as follows:
    - A curriculum that has been developed with involvement of a qualified speech and language therapist and includes communication strategies embedded into the classroom and residential settings.
    - Skills learnt at these sessions must then be practiced in class-based and everyday settings through communication of the targets and strategies that have been taught and reinforcement of those strategies and skills by staff that are experienced and trained in working with students with significant social communication and language needs.
    - Annual language reassessment and input to his annual review. The speech and language therapist will need to allow 3 hours on an annual basis for this and preparation of a report.

  • Comment

  • 30 Apr 2021
  • Yes

    Other

    Section F: Special Educational Needs Provision
    [On the EHCP form Section E outcomes are listed beside the Section F provision.]

    Communication and Interaction

    Provision to meet outcome:
    [child] continues to require a highly individualised curriculum including direct and indirect therapy provision from Speech and Language Therapists working with the Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy services integrated throughout his school week.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Joint planning sessions between therapists
    > Who is responsible:
    Speech and Language Therapist, Occupational Therapist and Physiotherapist

    [child] will also receive class-based support, to include modelling of strategies to his class team; and small-group daily 45-minute enrichment sessions, with a view to developing his social communication and participation skills.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Ongoing, generalised and 45 minutes daily.
    > Who is responsible:
    Jointly planned by therapists and teaching and residential staff

    Teaching and therapy staff need to ensure that the skills he learns in class can be generalised from school into community and residential settings.
    Therapists and teachers will need to work closely with the residential staff to ensure that programmes are delivered across settings and that progress is monitored and evaluated in the residential areas and in the community as well as in the classroom.
    Therapists and teachers should observe, assess and work with [child] in the residential and community settings so as to ensure functionality of skills.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Daily, ongoing
    > Who is responsible:
    Class and residential staff trained in working with pupils with significant language and communication impairment and complex needs, and family, to generalise support and advice written by a qualified Speech and Language Therapist.

    Direct and indirect input dedicated to [child] from a Speech and Language Therapist, supported by a 1: 1 TA, to amount to 13.5 hours per term to be delivered flexibly according to the therapist's discretion to advise on the communication environment and interaction and provide direct input on a weekly basis. In addition, the Speech and Language Therapist will provide 3.5 hours input on an annual basis to assess and provide reports for the annual review.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Regular group sessions as well as receiving weekly 1:1 input from a Speech and Language Therapist. 13.5 hours direct therapy per term and 3.5 hours of indirect input per year both by qualified SALT
    > Who is responsible:
    Speech and Language Therapist;
    individual support from a teaching assistant.

    Individual speech and language therapy sessions.

    Monitoring and support from Speech and Language Therapist to school staff for the use of alternative and augmentative communication equipment.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Weekly ongoing
    > Who is responsible:
    Direct support from a qualified Speech and Language Therapist.

    Implementation of his speech and language therapy programme via individual, small group and class based support.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Daily, ongoing
    > Who is responsible:
    Teaching staff; using advice from a qualified Speech and Language Therapist

    Speech and Language Therapist to spend one lunchtime per week with [child]; both to provide opportunities for social communication, and also to monitor his ongoing needs
    (dysphagia).
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    weekly
    > Who is responsible:
    Speech and Language Therapist



    Cognition and learning

    Focus needs to be placed on supporting [child] to gain the skills he will need as a young adult and to use these skills functionally across settings. This will require education to be delivered through an extended day curriculum with therapists and teachers ensuring that programmes are delivered beyond the school day.
    A curriculum that supports generalisation of skills between different people and across settings; hence he will require teaching of skills in different settings as well as support to generalise them across different people and contexts.
    [child]'s IEP needs to reflect small steps towards the overarching EHCP target and needs to be implemented throughout the extended day with therapy and teaching targets carried over between home and school.
    A multi-sensory and graded approach to achieve target goals in reading, writing, spelling and basic mathematical concepts.
    Access to the most appropriate information technology on a daily basis to aid his output of written work and numeracy skills and staff skilled and trained in using IT for such work.
    Structured reading, writing, spelling and maths programmes.
    A high level of in-class support to facilitate learning of new skills, to provide the opportunity to over learn and consolidate learning and keep him on task. [1:1 staffing available]
    Work focusing on specific difficulties with literacy and maths.
    Tasks presented to him one at a time, broken down into individual steps and in a hands-on way using a multi-sensory approach. Staff will link [child]'s learning to a realistic setting and will generalise skills across different environments.
    Monitoring and support of his homework to ensure that he understands what is required and can meet the demands of the work and ensure close supportive links are established and maintained with his family.
    Small class sizes with high levels of support.
    Wearing his glasses to help with vision.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Daily
    > Who is responsible:
    Class Teacher
    Provision to be generalised by residential staff and family.

    Language and communication skills used, modelled and reinforced by adults working with [child] that ensure he is able to label external and internal body parts and use appropriate vocabulary to describe different medical ailments.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    As part of the SALT and general curricula
    > Who is responsible:
    Class Teacher and residential staff; provision to be generalised. Advice to be sought from a SALT if necessary

    [child] to understand there is a consequence to telling a trusted adult that something hurts, feels different, requires medical support etc
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    ongoing
    > Who is responsible:
    Class Teacher and residential staff; provision to be generalised. Advice to be sought from a SALT if necessary

    Consistent use of visual timetables, indicating school day and individual lesson routine.
    Techniques to support and extend his ability to focus on different tasks for varying time periods and to generalise skills across settings.

    A fast-based movement with a 'heavy work' focus in order to gain appropriate arousal levels for optimum learning. [Daily; using advice from the Occupational Therapist]
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Daily
    > Who is responsible:
    Class Teacher and residential staff; provision to be generalised


    Social, emotional and mental health

    Small group work focusing on turns taking and representational play monitored and reviewed by a Speech and Language Therapist
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Weekly
    > Who is responsible:
    The Occupational Therapist will work alongside the Speech and Language Therapist, teacher, residential staff and family to develop [child]'s play and interaction skills.

    Activities in which [child] can interact, work and learn alongside known peers in structured activities and games facilitated by an adult.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Daily
    > Who is responsible:
    The Occupational Therapist will work alongside the Speech and Language Therapist, teacher, residential staff and family to develop [child]'s play and interaction skills.

    Opportunities and adult facilitation to interact with less well known or new peers in structured activities.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Daily
    > Who is responsible:
    Class Teacher and residential staff.

    Up-to-date behaviour plan and risk assessment.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Reviewed termly; or more frequently if necessary
    > Who is responsible:
    The Occupational Therapist will work alongside the Speech and Language Therapist, teacher, teaching and residential staff and family to produce a risk assessment



    Sensory and/or physical

    Occupational therapist's input to work with him on an individual basis. [child] requires weekly individual direct occupational therapy intervention. Direct intervention will use a combination of approaches, including Occupational Therapy-Sensory Integration (OT-SI), cognitive and behavioural strategies to help develop his body awareness, motor planning and independence in self-care. It will last for 45 minutes per week for treatment and allow 15 minutes per week for liaison with the school staff and parents. These sessions will develop his fine motor skills and provide him with sensory input in order to reduce the impact of his sensory processing such that he is in a ‘calm alert’ stage for learning.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Forty-five minutes per week direct intervention and fifteen minutes per week allocated to liaison with the school staff and parents.
    > Who is responsible:
    By a therapist who is qualified in Sensory Integration OT

    An individualised programme to address his fine motor, sensory as well as independent living skills. Produced via collaborative planning between class teacher, residential staff and the school Occupational Therapist.
    Continuing work in a small group to develop his fine motor skills such as in a fine motor skills circuit so that he is able to manage functional tasks such as buttons, zips and managing tools .
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    School-led implementation, and monitored and reviewed, when necessary, by the school OT.
    > Who is responsible:
    Class teacher, residential staff and the school Occupational Therapist

    Joint planning by Occupational Therapy and SALT input during daily Enrichment sessions.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Daily; 45 minutes
    > Who is responsible:
    Occupational Therapy and SALT

    Joint planning and input from OT and Physio to design a programme to use in class to take movement breaks every 20 minutes and stand at a lectern about once an hour for 10 minutes when it fits with classroom activities.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Ongoing; hourly during the day. Daily
    > Who is responsible:
    Occupational Therapist and Physio

    Liaising and joint working with residential staff to ensure targets are appropriate and skills generalised across settings and to ensure [child] is receiving the appropriate support to help him develop his skills in line with his targets. Liaising with [child]'s parents to discuss any issues that may arise and to provide feedback.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    ongoing
    > Who is responsible:
    Therapists, school and residential staff working with family

    Occupational Therapist to provide and advice, training and support to staff in delivering the sensory diet.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Sensory diet at least 3 times a day
    > Who is responsible:
    Staff, using OT advice

    The Occupational Therapist will contribute to [child]'s Annual Review through a report and when necessary, in personal attendance.
    > Amount and frequency of input:
    Annually
    > Who is responsible:
    Occupational Therapist

    [child]'s posture will continue to be managed using the following strategies:
    • The use of his TLSO brace during the day and night and assistance of staff who have received physiotherapy instruction to carry out daily stretching exercises in the morning and evening. [daily]
    • Daily participation in activities both in class and in residential setting designed to recruit core muscles of the trunk. [daily]
    • The daily use of specialist seating to provide a stable base and trunk support to enable maximum access to class activities. [daily]
    • The use of orthotics to maintain foot position and calf muscle length - AFO's or heel cups to be in place at all times during the day. [daily]
    • Monitor use of orthotics and brace and support staff in implementing postural advice. [ongoing]
    > Who is responsible:
    Class teacher, residential staff and the school using physiotherapist advice.

    The above strategies are designed to maintain symmetrical postures and muscle balance as far as possible, minimising stresses on and changes to neutral posture.

    [child]'s mobility will continue to be managed using the following strategies:
    • Daily time / space on the floor to stretch out and carry out his physiotherapy stretching programme for twenty minutes. This will be assisted by staff who have received physiotherapy instruction specifically related to the programme. [daily]
    • Daily opportunity to challenge his core muscle strength by the use of gym ball or outdoor gym programmes, prescribed by physiotherapist and again carried out by class staff instructed by physiotherapist. These programmes require approximately twenty to thirty minutes. [daily]
    • The above programmes will be reviewed on a termly basis, adapted or progressed as needs or target achievement require and class staff should be instructed as to changes. [termly]
    • [child] will be accompanied on daily walks in class and after school with facilitation of running to be incorporated. Regular trial of different motivating factors is recommended to achieve maximum voluntary participation, for example giving a functional purpose to walks such as to reach the shops, to deliver a message or object, to visit named people. [daily]
    • [child] will continue to be supervised on the stairs for safety. [ongoing, daily]
    • Access to weekly swimming sessions (school/residential) with advice to staff to ensure that he is swimming without float, feet off the floor in the deep end during free swimming time; participating more with his legs and not just his upper limbs; and given individual assistance to ensure he is engaging with and following the swimming teacher's instructions. [weekly]
    > Who is responsible:
    Class teacher, residential staff and the school using physiotherapist advice.

    [child]'s transfers will continue to be managed using the following strategies:
    • A yearly manual handling risk assessment to be carried out in school; at least yearly risk assessment in the swimming pool setting (frequency to be judged by class staff in attendance at swim sessions according to [child]'s progress and increased swimming ability and confidence). This will need to be carried out by school staff as physiotherapy not in school on allotted swim day. [Annually]
    > Who is responsible:
    Class teacher, residential staff swimming pool staff

    [child]'s gross motor skills will continue to be managed using the following strategies:
    • [child]'s physiotherapy programmes to be carried out daily at school, in residential setting as timetable allows and home. The programmes are to be implemented by class staff with instruction and advice from the Physiotherapist as required. Programmes include stretching, balance, co-ordination and core stability work. [Provision of physiotherapy programme to be carried out in class daily]
    • [child]'s teaching staff will request advice from physiotherapy for different areas of the curriculum to differentiate appropriate activities for [child] to participate in. [Ongoing; as necessary]
    • [child] must have access to a variety of physical environments / activities and be assisted in their use; at least one every day. To include: swimming, playground apparatus, use of adapted tricycle, walks around school and on uneven ground to forest school, floor work in class brain gym, physiotherapy stretching and gym ball programmes. [Ongoing; daily]
    • [child] will take part with support in out of school activities/clubs every day as he currently does through Hyde house - Monday swimming, Tuesday life skills, Wednesday cyclopark and Thursday shopping.
    [Daily; according to weekly rota of activities]
    > Who is responsible:
    Class teacher, residential staff and the school using physiotherapist advice

    Physiotherapy will provide:
    • Half-termly review of [child]'s abilities, challenges and the resulting programmes to address those needs; [half termly reviews]
    • Re-assessment of the objective assessment - Gross Motor Function Measure, towards the end of each school year; [annual re-assessment]
    • Liaison with [child]'s parents, school and residential staff to identify specific needs; [as necessary]
    • Liaison with other professionals involved in [child]'s care as needed; [as necessary]
    • Provision of a Care Plan, updated on an annual basis; [annually]
    • Provision of suitable programmes to be used within class timetable and at home; advice and support in their implementation; [ongoing daily]
    • Advice and training for education staff regarding gross motor I PE activities; [ongoing]
    • Advice regarding postural care; use and fit of orthosis and support to access orthotic clinics if needed; [ongoing]
    • Advice to promote health and well-being; [ongoing]
    • Advice regarding access of community sports activities /clubs and how to adapt/modify physical activities that happen throughout the school day; [ongoing]
    • Annual Review report detailing [child]'s physiotherapy input, progress and recommendations. [annually]
    > Who is responsible:
    Physiotherapist

    A high desk to support his posture when working. [daily]
    > Who is responsible
    School using physiotherapist/OT advice

    Adult assistance with self-care tasks, including toileting, lunchtimes and dressing. [daily, as required]
    Self-care· activities will be incorporated throughout his school day to further maximise his independence. [daily, as required]
    Tasks will be broken down into activity sequences and practiced regularly throughout the day. Each activity sequence will be supported by a visual schedule, with a consistent approach. [daily]
    Small group work to further develop his self-care independence. [weekly]
    > Who is responsible
    Class Teacher and residential staff using advice provided by OT and SALT

    Monitoring of his eating, drinking and swallowing needs. [daily, as required]
    Eating and Drinking Guidelines; to be written by Speech and Language Therapist who is qualified in dysphagia management. [Available daily]
    Individual support during meal times to implement [child]'s Eating and Drinking Guidelines and monitor his eating, drinking and swallowing. Once a week to be supported and monitored bv SALT. [daily]
    > Who is responsible
    From a member of school staff who has received dysphagia training with a Speech and Language Therapist who is qualified in dysphagia management.

    Participate in sensory-based activities to enable him to access the curriculum. In particular, these types of activities are essential before any seated programme. [At regular interval throughout the day]
    > Who is responsible
    Class Teacher and residential staff

  • Comment

  • 28 Apr 2021
  • Yes

    Other

    Section F

    Cognition and Learning
    The class teacher, working in collaboration with the SENCo and other professionals will ensure:
    [child] requires familiar staff who can interpret his needs and adapt his access to learning opportunities if required.
    Staff to model naming and identification of colours/shapes/numbers during day-to-day and motivating activities.
    Physical resources should be used to support [child] to acquire basic learning skills. Links between the physical resources and preferred method of alternative and augmented communication ([child] is currently using PODD conmunication book) should be made.

    [child]'s learning will be supported by visual cues to reinforce spoken language. This will include pictures, objects, and gestures to support his understanding of language and increase his vocabulary.
    [child] needs visual resources to support his understanding of instructions and classroom tasks. Staff to model the use of relevant non-verbal communication methods and gestures to support expressive language.

    [child] will need daily, structured opportunities (with input from a speech and language therapist as deemed appropriate from the commissioning authority) to develop his communication skills using the modes of communication best suited to him. This is likely to involve both augmented communication and verbal language.
    [child] should have daily 1: 1 / small group sessions where he can develop and rehearse vocabulary and eventually phrases that will support social and academic communication so that [child] can be part of sharing with the class within circle time, etc. Adults should plan rehearsal time into the structure and routine of the school day and give [child] planned opportunities to contribute, with practice beforehand.
    [child] will require opportunities to share his knowledge, using both verbal and non-verbal communication. This should include activities linked to but not limited to, matching, grouping and comparing.
    Staff who have knowledge and experience of supporting young people with a profile of needs similar to [child].
    Additionally, those who are either trained or able to be trained in the alternative and augmented communication tools that will be used to support the development of [child]'s communication skills and in using the equipment and resources provided to support his physical needs.

    Communication and Interaction
    The class teacher, working in collaboration with the SENCo and other professionals will ensure:
    [child] will be offered speech and language therapy to develop his functional communication skills, to enable him to reach full potential. This may include:
    • SLT to support teaching staff / parents to create opportunities for communication
    • SLT to support staff in using his communication book to communicate with him and enable him to communicate with others
    • [child] will be provided with targets (as detailed in this report) developed by an SLT and carried ut by education staff and parents throughout his daily activities.
    • In addition [child] needs periods of speech and language therapy intervention delivered by an SLT / SLT Assistant as appropriate. This will be offered as 18 sessions per year. Included in the 18 sessions will be any maintenance / update of the current communication system and review sessions as appropriate.

    Review sessions will consider all aspects of [child] communication and may include:
    • face to face sessions with the child in setting, home or clinic
    • liaison with education staff
    • telephone reviews
    • classroom observation

    The sessions will be arranged throughout the year in the most appropriate frequency depending on [child]'s current level of need; for example, a higher frequency may be needed to establish the use of a new communication system or to establish his communication system in a new setting, e.g. a change of nursery / school.
    The SLT will support parents and education staff to understand and support [child]'s speech and language difficulties, so that everyday language can be adapted appropriately.
    To achieve maximum benefit, all speech and language therapy goals should be fully integrated into [child]'s daily life.
    [child]'s clinical needs may change throughout the course of the next year. Should the frequency of support need to be altered, this may be carried out prior to his next annual review. This will be done through consultation with his parents and educators and will be led by his clinical need.
    The SLT/ SLTA will access ongoing advice and liaison regarding [child] from SLT colleagues who are working routinely in the filed of AAC and who have additional training in this field.
    Access to a curriculum differentiated for a child of his particular stage of development and supported by a 'total communication' environment. For example, use of visual timetables, Makaton signing, switch work and further development of his PODD communication book.
    Symbols/visuals to express emotions and feelings relevant to [child] (sad, tired, pain, hot, cold, too many people, too loud) should be introduced to [child] from the alternative and augmented communication system of preference (e.g. [child] is currently using_ a PODD communication book) during focussed individual work based on developing his communication and interaction.
    Stories based on different feelings and ways that children deal with them can be introduced to [child].
    Adults to notice if [child] is unusually quiet, uncooperative or engaged and to ensure he has access to visual emotions and feelings cues.
    [child] will require daily 1: 1 opportunities to communicate his feelings, needs and discussions about his day with a familiar member of staff to practice using his PODD.
    Staff to model how the symbols are used during times they can see that [child] is upset or frustrated. This should include supporting [child] to name the feelings.
    The next step of choosing from a range of 'solutions' / 'strategies' can also be modelled initially, with the aim of the modelling being generalised by [child] when he is able to notice himself feeling that way.
    These should include activities that [child] enjoys / is motivated by/ will provide him with an opportunity to regulate his emotions e.g. going to read a book in a quiet corner, having some alone time with some toys, watching some songs on 'YouTube', taking off a jumper, lying down for a short while, moving from chair to another position, sensory activities etc.
    Staff who have knowledge and experience of supporting young people with a profile of needs similar to [child].
    Additionally, those who are either trained or able to be trained in alternative and augmented communication tools that will be used to support the development of [child]'s communication skills.

    Social, Emotional and Mental Health
    The class teacher, working in collaboration with the SENCo and other professionals will ensure:
    Gradual support in developing social skills first with adults and then in pairs with another child. Small social groups in which the adult models conversations and play will help [child] feel more comfortable in social situations. Adults could use games based on activities or toys he is motivated by to engage him in turn taking and sharing.
    Explicit cues for turn-taking, such as wearing a cap if it is your turn, will help [child] to learn social expectations.
    Staff to use an 'intensive interaction' (Nind and Hewett) approach by first observing [child] in his play, then extending or modifying actions.
    Staff to use small groups to model developmentally appropriate language/non-verbal communication that can be used for turn-taking, helping [child] to feel more confident to be involved in such situations.
    [child]'s peers should be supported in becoming familiar with his communication systems so that he can develop relationships with them to support his social and emotional development.

    Staff to use songs and nursery rhymes to engage [child] in social interactions and begin to teach him reciprocal conversation, for example using 'call and respond' songs. This should include encouraging and modelling developmentally appropriate verbal and non-verbal interactions.
    Staff who have knowledge and experience of supporting young people with a profile of needs similar to [child]. Additionally, those who are either trained or able to be trained in alternative and augmented communication tools that will be used to support the development of his communication skills.

    Other e.g. Sensory and Physical/Independence and Self-care
    The class teacher, working in collaboration with the SENCo and other professionals will ensure:
    Nursery/school to:
    Ensure that any individualised exercise programmes, or delegated therapeutic activities are incorporated within the curriculum
    Provide staff with adequate moving and handling training, so they are able to risk assess and determine appropriate moving and handling techniques
    Ensure [child] can use his specialist seating system for daily educational activities, and has adult support for standing transfers
    Provide adult support for [child] to engage and access education and play activities throughout the school day.
    Provide opportunities within the school day for [child] to develop, practice and consolidate emerging self-care skills such as dressing with support school staff
    Aid when mobilising around the environment to encourage this as often as possible
    Ensure [child] wears his orthotics as advised
    To ensure that any individualised exercise programmes are incorporated within the curriculum

    OT service will:
    Review nursery environment as required to advise re access/safety
    Provide a block of OT sessions when functional goals can be set.
    Provide and demonstrate advice and activities as required that can be carried out by nursery staff
    Ensure that key staff have knowledge and training in the use of specialist equipment
    The OT will review [child]'s equipment needs at least bi­annually unless indicated otherwise. Nursery and home are invited to contact the OT with any concerns at any other time.
    Details regarding [child]'s specialist seating system will be contained
    Provide familiar staff to support [child] with self-care tasks throughout the nursery day including dressing, toileting and feeding.
    Have access to toileting facilities with a ring reducer and step. He may at times require access to a changing area/ hygiene suite for nappy changes and staff to support his access to hygiene activities
    Have an identified adult to support his feeding during meal times e.g. to cut up food, and during dressing tasks throughout the school day, such as changing for PE.
    Staff to encourage [child] to use cutlery at the start of a meal, then allow fingers to finish if fatigued. Gradually work towards using cutlery for more of the meal.
    Provide and demonstrate advice and activities as required that can be carried out by nursery staff e.g. OT/OTA to demonstrate forward and backward chaining approach to support with dressing and using cutlery if required
    Provide staff with adequate moving and handling training, so they are able to risk assess and determine appropriate moving and handling techniques
    Ensure [child] sits in the assessed classroom chair as advised.
    Ensure [child] has the opportunity to use his floor sitter and standing frame daily for up to 60 minutes.
    Ensure [child] has opportunities to participate in physical activity with the required support.

    Physio to:
    Review nursery environment as required to advise re access/safety
    Provide a block of Physiotherapy sessions when functional goals can be set.
    Provide and demonstrate advice and activities as required that can be carried out by nursery staff
    Ensure that key staff have knowledge and training in the use of specialist equipment
    Review progress and advice termly at home and/or nursery.
    The physio will review [child]'s equipment needs at least annually unless indicated otherwise. Nursery and home are invited to contact the physio with any concerns at any other time.
    Details regarding [child]'s standing frame will be contained within the equipment pack issued along with the frame.
    Access to trike to be able to take part in school play times with peers.

  • Comment

  • 28 Apr 2021
  • Yes

    Other

    F: Provision
    (F) Special Educational Provision (Who, how, what and when?)

    SEN strategies and provision to be provided by the educational setting:
    Communication & Interaction:
    All staff working with [child] must have the relevant skills and knowledge of autism and how to support children with autism in the school environment. Training should be accessed from an appropriate training provider as needed to ensure all staff have the necessary knowledge and understanding of how to support [child] during his school day.
    Teaching staff should daily provide [child] with opportunities to work or play with 1-2 peers, in groups that naturally occur within the classroom in order for him to experience social aspects of communication, such as proximity, sharing and turn taking. These groups have to be adult-led. Adults should teach [child] a phrase like “can I play” to his peers, and support [child] to use his words rather than physicality.
    For example, [child] could do a survey of adults and tally the results.
    During structured activities adults should model turn taking. A “my turn card” should be used so that he can see that he is either ‘waiting’ or it is ‘my turn’. Use of a sand timer is also recommended to show [child] how long he will be waiting for.
    In addition to day to day opportunities in the classroom [child] should also take part in structured small group sessions to develop these skills. The group will be demonstrated, modelled to a member of staff, and reviewed by a Speech and language Therapist and carried forward by a member of staff.
    As well as using visuals, adults supporting [child] should provide him with clear models of asking to join in, or asking for a turn within a structured activity.
    A structured, weekly programme to enhance [child]’s social communication skills, including modelling and opportunities for practice. This will include every day, realistic examples, to discuss and role play individually, in pairs and in a group, how to join in others’ games, sharing and co-operating. This intervention should be carried out by a suitably experienced staff member and incorporate built in review structures.
    In whole class sessions, [child] will continue to need a chair slightly away from the class. Use the backward chaining method to help him to join in by having him attend the last few minutes of a session and gradually build backwards. Always support him with a sand timer and now/next so he knows how long he will be there for and what will be happening next.
    Teach [child] about facial expressions through looking at a film/photos/mirror work and through drama and role play. Use mirrors and take photos of [child] using different expressions and label them. [child] could collect a scrap book of different expressions.
    Use a motivating activity such as a treasure box containing a range of sensory or cause and effect toys to motivate [child] to pay attention and listen. The adult should demonstrate them to [child] in an exciting way using positive support prompts such as sit, wait and look
    [child] will require ongoing and specific support to facilitate his functional communication
    [child] requires support to interact with peers, to understand social rules and expectations and to understand how to share in different contexts.

    Cognition & learning:
    SEN strategies and provision to be provided by the educational setting:
    Adults working with [child] will ensure that:
    They have his attention before giving an instruction
    Instructions are being broken down into accessible chunks
    Instructions are being repeated
    A visual time table (with symbols) is consistently used within the classroom setting. This will allow [child] to prepare himself for any changes to his day and help him with transitions.
    [child] is a visual learner and benefits from visuals to support his understanding of the curriculum. During lessons staff should use visuals e.g. Natural gesture, written/pictorial instructions, Now/Next boards, video clips, visual checklist or visual self-help cue cards
    Provide [child] with visual reminders of time, such as the use of egg timers, real time clocks, stop watch etc. which will help to develop his ability to sustain concentration.
    [child] has an individually tailored curriculum. All his work in class needs to be differentiated to his level and made visual.
    Pre-teach [child] in a calm and quiet area how to play with specific activities that will be used in the classroom.
    Frequent opportunities for learning breaks. These should include regular movement (eg going on errands/a walk, wheelbarrow walks, carrying something heavy, jumping on trampette) followed by a calming activity (eg listening to calming music, blowing bubbles, stress ball, gently squeezing his shoulders) to prepare for learning.
    Provide short learning tasks and activities, and where possible followed by rewarding him for his efforts i.e. completion of a self-directed task.
    Use photographs of different possible ways of playing with toys (eg the marble run) to show [child] what is possible and teach him flexibility
    Ensure that [child] participates in activities that will allow him to feel competent and successful and develop a positive view of himself as a learner.
    Provide support at transition points and give warning of the different steps in activities by visual schedules and task management boards.
    Use of hands-on experiences and multisensory opportunities, to explore and extend his basic words and number. Using direct structured teaching approaches and incidental learning with much repetition and rehearsal.
    Demonstration, hand -over-hand, modelling and repetition should be used across the school day to support his learning.
    [child] should have access to learning in a sensory motor friendly and coordination friendly environment.
    Continue to use [child]’s special interests and experiences to engage him in his learning. Wherever possible relate [child]’s learning to his own experience so that his learning is in a context he understands.
    In view of [child]’s difficulties with developing his early literacy and numeracy skills support will need to be little and often as he needs a lot of repetition to enable him to generalise what he has learned.
    [child] generally needs support to focus him on adult-directed tasks, to prompt him and to redirect him when he is off task. He will need systems and resources in place to support his poor attention control whilst developing his ability to work with some independence on adult-led tasks.
    [child] needs his work to be highly differentiated and delivered on an individual basis to access year 1.


    Sensory and/or Physical
    SEN strategies and provision to be provided by the educational setting:
    [child] is to attempt tasks independently after the task is discussed and demonstrated. Timing devices should be used to help him to know how long he needs to have ‘a go’ before asking for help.
    Break tasks down using a step by step approach with visual aides to assist [child] in following a set procedure to task completion.
    [child] requires times within the school day to practice building skills in independence and personal self-care tasks.
    [child] requires adult support to facilitate the practice of independent and personal self-care tasks and the utilisation of recommendations through the school day as part of a daily routine. This would be best achieved by a structured day with visual support, ie an individual routine with a finished pouch.
    The use of the ‘backwards chaining’ method to be used when learning new skills e.g. dressing. This is where the adult does all of the dressing steps except the last one which [child] has to complete and then works his way backwards
    [child] requires adult support for self-care activities such as with dressing, prompting for toileting sequence and wiping after opening his bowels, and with cutting up tough foods.
    Set up an individual workstation for [child] to use in a quiet area of the classroom

    Occupational Therapy SEN-funded Provision (Enhanced OT Provision):
    If [child] is attending a school which does not have OT provision as part of its local offer:
    o Occupational Therapist to provide up to two school visits to set up a coordination and sensory-motor friendly classroom environment for [child] lasting up to 1.5 hours during the first academic year. Following this he will be discharged
    o The occupational therapist will need 2 hours to write a written advice plan that incorporates constructive movement breaks and calming strategies around short bursts of intensive table top activities that focus on functional skills building in the areas of handwriting, tool use as well as self-care skills.

    SEN strategies and provision to be provided by the educational setting:
    Adults working with [child] to:
    Ensure that all staff working closely with [child] have attended relevant training (e.g. by ASD outreach team) and read the detailed recommendations in the ASD outreach report
    Help to prepare [child] for any change to routine or situation, by using real objects, pictures or gestures.
    Further develop, and frequently use, a bank of practical strategies to enable [child] to begin to take charge of how to regulate his emotions. Social stories (eg “Social Stories and Comic Book Conversations” by Carol Grey), breathing exercises, making and using an “I can” book, counting down (holding a timer), a favourite object from home or a toy, photographs and physically moving to a low arousal space, are some strategies which can be used and developed on over time. If [child] finds social stories too personal consider using Hero Stories instead
    Use both a proactive approach (to reduce likelihood of emotional instability) and a reactive approach (ie ensuring a consistent response to behaviour)
    Ensure he practises self-regulation strategies on a daily basis, for example, and as noted under other headings:
    - A low arousal environment
    - Sensory circuits
    - A safe space

    [child] will need explicit teaching about emotions, in different contexts to help him generalise his understanding
    Teach [child] a calming routine. An example might be taking two deep breaths, rubbing hands together, closing his eyes and taking two more deep breaths. Practice this routine several times every day. Make a habit of doing the routine before events that are predictably difficult for [child] to tolerate (e.g. transitions).
    When playing with other children, provide [child] with visuals to help to develop new ideas and perhaps agree something to build together. Give [child] support and reassurance to develop an idea. Using thought bubbles may help [child] to see that others have different ideas and that this is ok.
    Introduce a “not available” visual to put on certain toys or objects.
    Introduce the concept of “oops” (supported by visuals) to help manage unexpected change.
    Staff must understand the impact of [child]’s anxiety on his behaviours. [child] will need access to a quiet comfortable space following a meltdown or when he is struggling to self-regulate. Supporting adults must remember not to use too much language at this time.
    [child] needs adult help to be able to identify when he needs support from others to regulate his emotions. If [child] is not provided adult help he will not be able to manage his emotions and in turn access classroom learning.

  • Comment

  • 25 Mar 2021
  • Yes

    Simple

    My Special Educational Provision
    Access to resources and trained staff to develop an individual programme in liaison with the Speech and Language Therapist and the Hearing Impaired Specialist
    Daily access to a Teacher of the Deaf
    A structured language programme, integrated across the school day and across the curriculum.
    Visual support for vocabulary, both spoken and written.

    A programme devised and presented in small steps for Literacy and Numeracy.
    Teaching strategies which continue to support the development of his concentration and attention in learning situations
    Targeted work to address basic concepts and skills presented in a way which is clear, repetitive, multi-sensory and achievable.

    Structured play opportunities and support with interactions with his peers which is facilitative rather than intrusive.
    Support with developing his understanding of the nuances of behaviour in social situations, as some aspects of verbal behaviour in complex social situations, particularly in groups, will not be available to him.

    Daily support and guidance from trained professionals to develop his independence when managing his audiological equipment.
    Access to and regular monitoring of his assistive technologies.
    Access to an optimal acoustic environment in which teaching and learning can take place.

  • Comment